Editorial

By Tower Staff

It’s easy to care about national politics, because that’s what we’re most widely exposed to. It pops up constantly in the form of CNN updates and Facebook videos. We sometimes forget that we live in the hub of it all.

     It takes more effort to care about things we have to seek out, to care about information that is not immediately provided to us with no effort on our part.
     This is not a problem unique to college students, but it is applicable to all college students. We at Catholic University are a population of D.C. transplants; and while yes, most of us are from just outside of Philly, some of us are from farther reaches of the nation, and many of us aren’t even from the United States.
     Yet, while we attend CUA we are residents of D.C. While the district sometimes seems like it belongs to the politicians and to the newscasters, it’s our home too. We have our favorite coffee shops, our favorite museums, and our favorite wine from Wardman’s.
     It’s easy to get trapped in a cycle of yelling at MSNBC and texting our roommates Politico articles, but it’s important to remember that D.C. isn’t just the capital of the nation, and it’s not just national politics we should care about. D.C. is a true college town and  our home, and we should treat it like such.

     So this week, let’s start thinking of ourselves not just as CUA students but as D.C. residents. So what do we, as residents, want to see change in our city?It’s easy to care about national politics, because that’s what we’re most widely exposed to. It pops up constantly in the form of CNN updates and Facebook videos. We sometimes forget that we live in the hub of it all.

     It takes more effort to care about things we have to seek out, to care about information that is not immediately provided to us with no effort on our
part.
     This is not a problem unique to college students, but it is applicable to all college students. We at Catholic University are a population of D.C. transplants; and while yes, most of us are from just outside of Philly, some of us are from farther reaches of the nation, and many of us aren’t even from the United States.
     Yet, while we attend CUA we are residents of D.C. While the district sometimes seems like it belongs to the politicians and to the newscasters, it’s
our home too. We have our favorite coffee shops, our favorite museums, and our favorite wine from Wardman’s.
     It’s easy to get trapped in a cycle of yelling at MSNBC and texting our roommates Politico articles, but it’s important to remember that D.C. isn’t just the capital of the nation, and it’s not just national politics we should care about. D.C. is a true college town and  our home, and we should treat it like such.
     So this week, let’s start thinking of ourselves not just as CUA students but as D.C. residents. So what do we, as residents, want to see change in our city?

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